Dog Friendly Cottages in Pembrokeshire

Pembrokeshire in Wales is home to The South West Coast Path, a National Park which is the UK’s longest National Trail spanning a mighty 186 miles of uninterrupted walking bliss with panoramic views of the ocean. So, naturally, Pembrokeshire, which sits on that coast line, is a great place to take the dogs and the whole family for an active, natural but also enriching holiday.

7 Dog Friendly Cottages Found

The Old Stable

Wolf's Castle, Haverfordwest SA62 5NB

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The Old Stable is one of three dog-friendly Pembrokeshire cottages sharing a…

From £273 per week
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Bwthyn Y Jacdo

Whitechurch, Crymych SA41 3RU, UK

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Dog-friendly Bwthyn Y Jacdo is a delightful two-bedroom cottage in the Pembrokeshire…

From £287 per week
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The Duck House

Wolf's Castle, Haverfordwest SA62 5NB, UK

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Located just two miles from Wolfcastle, near Haverfordwest, this lovely little cottage…

From £308 per week
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The Coach House

Wolf's Castle, Haverfordwest SA62 5NB, UK

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The Coach House is one of three dog-friendly Pembrokeshire cottages sharing a…

From £312 per week
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Bwthyn Bach

Nevern, Newport SA42 0PA, UK

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Dog-friendly Bwthyn Bach is one of four cottages on a family-run farm…

From £354 per week
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Derry Cottage

Whitland, SA34 0RB

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Dog-friendly Derry Cottage is a Grade II listed country cottage, with a…

From £371 per week
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Coppet Hall Lodge

Saundersfoot, UK

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Coppet Hall Lodge is in the perfect location if you’re wanting the…

From £876 per week
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Pembrokeshire travel guides

 

Take the dogs to Pembrokeshire

Pembrokeshire is a county in the south west of Wales, known by many, including National Geographic, as home to the world’s best coastline. Famous not only because of its sheer length of 186 miles but its incredible beauty, The Pembrokeshire Coastal Path is a UK national park despite being predominantly made up of path for walkers and hikers – and the occasional herd of goats!

Whether you prefer the reasonably structured beach paths, squelching your toes in the sand instead, or rather exploring historical landmarks and gardens, the options are all there in Pembrokeshire and the more you can sample, the better.

Before we get onto the walking, which is always a top priority on our pawed-pals’ holiday to-do list, let’s start with some key cities and towns in the Welsh county. The use of the word “city” there may come as a surprise, given that non-metropolitan counties are usually more of the village and town variety, but this is a fun fact about the county that will most definitely come up in a pub-quiz one day, so listen up.

St David’s in Pembrokeshire is not just a city, but the UK’s smallest city, the reason being that back in the day, cities were established based on only one criteria: that there be a cathedral. If you haven’t heard of St David’s Cathedral, it’s quite spectacular, and one thing is certain, you’ll never forget it. The small community of St David’s, accessible to the unmissable expanse that is Whitesands Beach, a 2019 Blue Flag Beach sheltered by Carn Llidi hill, is one of Pembrokeshire’s most visited places. Nowadays, St David’s is much too small for what most people would consider a city. But St David’s Cathedral is beautiful and a main Pembrokeshire attraction! Other than St David’s, though, the general assumption that it’s littered with quaint villages and seaside towns is an accurate one. There’s Tenby, Pembroke, Manorbier, Fishguard, Saint Dogmaels and many more – some so small you might miss them if you’re not exploring properly!

Next up, the beaches. The beaches in this part of the world have one fatal flaw: they may ruin all other UK beaches for you, because their soft, golden sand is arguably unrivalled. The entire area, given its suitability to dog-holidays, is therefore well-equipped to handle them, from taps and bathrooms to bins. Top spots that are suitable and accepting of dogs include: Newgale Sands, Llansteffan beach, Newport Sands, Barafundle Bay and Manorbier beach, but there are plenty of hidden gems to be found if you simply explore the coastline (which is of course made easy by the enormous pathway that connects them all!)

Want to walk without a beach? No problem. There are woodland and castle gardens aplenty just waiting to be explored. Try out Colby Woodland Garden, Stackpole, Picton Castle & Gardens, Cilgerran Castle, St David’s Peninsula, and be sure to sample a Welsh cake in the cafe at each because they’re guaranteed to be delicious.

There are activities that are slightly more stimulating than just a scenic walk, though, which shouldn’t come as a surprise when you consider the rich history of Wales and the region specifically, where coal mining took place as early as the 14th century. Places to visit to get a taster for the people who came before include: Pembroke Castle, Hilton Court Gardens, Colby Woodland Garden, Heatherton and the National Botanic Gardens.

Visit the National Trust’s small peak of Mwnt, overlooking a little secret encaved beach and craggy hills. It’s a short drive from Saint Dogmaels, which is a picturesque village on the estuary of Pembrokeshire’s River Teifi.

Alternatively, you might want to walk along Narbeth’s fashionable shopping highstreet packed with boutiques and, if you’re there in September, the stalls of the well-known Narbeth Food Festival, a showcase of Welsh community, food and spirit. In general, Pembrokeshire county is a celebration of the ocean, the outdoors and the Welsh countryside.