Dog Friendly Cottages in Derbyshire

Derbyshire features many hidden treasures including the town of Buxton, home to the world-famous spa water. Bakewell, famous for the invention of Bakewell Pudding, was visited by Jane Austen and the Rutland Arms’ features in her novel Pride & Prejudice. If your looking for somewhere to walk your dogs, the Peak District National Park features old stone walls, hidden valleys and tiny villages.

5 Dog Friendly Cottages Found

Collecting Yard

Buxton SK17 0LG

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Surrounded by hills and pastures, this is an ideal getaway for dog…

From £307 per week
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The Cottage

Waterhouses, Stoke-on-Trent, ST10 3HH

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A two-bedroom cottage situated on the edge of the Peak District National…

From £423 per week
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Butterlands Farmhouse

Stoke-on-Trent ST8 7LF

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Dog-friendly Butterlands Farmhouse is a spacious cottage full of historic charm blended…

From £488 per week
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Stallington Hall Farm

Stoke-on-Trent ST11 9QJ, UK

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Dog-friendly Stallington Hall Farm is a Grade II listed Tudor-built cottage in…

From £603 per week
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Willow Brook

Brook St, Glossop SK13, UK

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Dog-friendly Willow Brook is a luxurious detached holiday house just outside Glossop…

From £1,262 per week
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Derbyshire travel guides

 

Take the dogs to Derbyshire

It’s not easy to summarise a place like Derbyshire, because there’s not just one thing to say about it and what it has to offer. If anything, it’s got a bit of everything, so that’s probably the best way to approach this: here is a brief explanation of the various things Derbyshire has to offer.

Let’s be systematic about this and break Derbyshire down geographically, then further unpacking what’s available for you and your dogs in each section. The major town of Derbyshire is of course its part-namesake, Derby. Located in the south of the county on the banks of the River Derwent, Derby is a university town once known for its silk industry and is jam-packed of culturally significant activities to schedule into your visit.

If you love intricate architecture but find your dogs won’t quite enjoy a trip around the Derby Museum and Art Gallery (or rather, the curators said a hard no to their guided tour), there’s also the Gothic Derby Cathedral in its towering glory to enjoy from outside. You might not be able to take your pups to the Derby County Football Club at the iPro Stadium, but you might be tempted to kick a ball around the greenery surrounding the Derby Boating Lake in Markeaton Park.

While cultural city hubs like Derby are excellent in their own right, it’s likely that you’re heading to Derbyshire for its natural wonder and therefore breaking out of the city is probably one of the first steps to your dog-friendly visit to the county. If it’s the call of the wild, sweeping hills, babbling brooks and luscious pathways that get you excited, then head north and don’t stop until you hit the Peak District National Park.

The Mam Tour is perfect if you’re not a big walker or are squeezing a dog-walk in before heading out to another activity. It’s short, includes breathtaking views, and introduces you to some of the region’s fascinating ancient history. The Great Ridge and Win Hill is considered to be on of the most walked routes in England – so there’s a story to take back home as it is! It connects the summits of Lose Hill (476m) and Mam Tor (517m), so you might want to do this in conjunction with Mam Tor if you are still rearing to go once you summit. It also splits the gritstone Dark Peak in the North from the limestone dales in the South, making it an eye-catching route if ever there was one.

The Peak District isn’t your only option when it comes to walking in Derbyshire, although it’s most people’s go-to. Blending your walks with some culturally significant buildings, houses, castles and villages can be a great way of combining the culture of the region with its walking potential. There’s Elvaston Castle Country Park, Calke Abbey, Crich Tramway Village, Kedleston Hall, and those are just starting with the ones that welcome dogs with open arms, though some have varying restrictions on their indoor areas and facilities.

Days out that are less orientated around walking, but still outdoors and therefore good for dogs, include The Heights of Abraham, Dovedale, Peak District National Park, Peveril Castle and Arbor Low Stone Circle.